12

There is a conflict of interest between gardening requirements and stormwater requirements: Stormwater barrels should be kept empty, garden barrels should be kept full. Though a rain barrel or tank could make a useful water retention device, it loses its value as a stormwater load-reduction mechanism when you retain the water for gardening or other ...


11

Short Answer First of all, let me say that I love rain barrels, and have them installed at both homes I've owned (both older homes that are already fully landscaped). I think rain barrels are great water saving devices, and can provide some buffer against run-off. They're also cheap and easy to install, and can often repurpose existing containers. However, ...


5

It's possible that the source was talking about a practice called jetting that municipalities use to clean their sanitary sewer systems. I know one town that cleaned their system this way every other year.


5

I have run into the same quandary. I resolved it by keeping a large bin in my sink that catches "grey water" or water already used for washing dishes and add a drop of biodegradable phosphate-free soap and lather it up and dunk it in the grey water as my pre-recycling rinse. Keeping a bin inside my sink and salvaging grey water really cuts down my water use. ...


4

This is not a problem if you use a basin to wash dishes. As I soap dishes it goes in an empty basin in one half the sink. I rinse the dishes in the basin one at a time and put in rack. As I do so the basin fills up with the soapy rinse water. I have a full basin at the end of the wash. I can use this water to wash a kitchen rag to wipe down counters and/...


4

The main thing we found is that in everything, use less. Over time you will be able to work down to quite low usage without major hassles. It sounds kinda obvious, but it works. In Melbourne (Australia) during a major drought they introduced "target 155", or 155 litres of water per person per day. It's possible to do better, and from that article: Go dual ...


4

I collect water in a bucket using extension feeder pipe as shown in figure. I reuse the water released from system for daily household cleaning purpose. I checked the TDS value at all stages and it is as following: Source (Tap Water from government): 800-850 ppm Filtered water (RO+UV): 120-130 ppm Released water (stored in bucket): 1000-1100 ppm Released ...


3

This concept is called xeriscaping, a term coined in 1981 by the water authority of Denver, Colorado, USA, in efforts to encourage residents to reduce water usage in their gardens and yards. Xeriscaping focuses on selecting plants which are appropriate to the local climate in arid regions. Usually this means selecting native plants. There are many different ...


3

I suppose as with most things it depends (climate, precipitation, erosion factors, season, etc.) But I can't imagine a scenario in which I would rather have rain-barrels instead of say a rain-garden with water absorbing swails on contour. Or better yet a "Natural Swimming Pool" or "Plunge Pool"! On the advantages of a rain garden over rain barrels: ...


3

Two technologies I know of are plastic balls and solar panels. Both are very visible, and may not be aesthetically acceptable. Shade balls are used to reduce the exposed surface area and reflect sunlight. They're used in LA for example. Floating solar panels are expensive but of course produce power, and more efficiently than on neighbouring land because ...


3

Your shower water is already going into the same waste pipe that sewage from the toilet or septic system empties into. I think if you have a lot of soap you might end up with soap suds or scum inside the tank of the toilet, but I don't think that it would hurt the waste infrastructure in any way.


3

Others have already suggested low flow fixtures and reducing water usage, but here are a few other ideas, from least to most expensive: Turn down your water heater. The U.S. Department of Energy recommends a setting of ~120 F / 50 C. Many water heaters are set at the factory to 140 F / 60 C, which can increase the standby losses (energy spent keeping the ...


3

I can provide an answer for the first part of the question: No new water diversions out of the Great Lakes region are allowed. Great Lakes water agreement The 2005 Great Lakes–Saint Lawrence River Basin Sustainable Water Resources Agreement prohibits diversion of water from the Great Lakes outside of the Great Lakes Basin: The compact is an agreement ...


2

I don't know about to what extent it currently exists, but I can imagine it could be implemented successfully with a "reasonable usage" policy. In my experience as a customer, being asked to pay very exact, tiny amounts for one thing or another is often frustrating, especially if I've paid good money for something like a hotel room. However, when my phone ...


1

Yes, hotels could implement room-based monitoring systems for electricity and water consumption, but they have no financial motivation to do so and the effects of doing so are marginal verging on insignificant. Assuming the 7% reduction (due to IHDs, determined by the meta study) is accurate and translates to hotels, and given that rooms account for only ~...


1

The biggest thing by far is turning off/down heating and air conditioning. Note that in some climates/jurisdictions, your insurance may not pay out for damage from any cause (not just frozen pipes) if the house wasn't heated while you were away. Mine says >15C at all times, which some parts aren't even overnight when I'm at home. I used to have a frost ...


1

If the heating is turned off in wintertime, the water-heater might be enough to keep the water pipes from freezing. Otherwise, the water can be turned off, the pipes drained with open faucets, and both heater and water-heater turned off. In fact the water might have to be turned off at the street because of the high-pressure it has coming from the street. If ...


1

To save water get a low flow shower head and when using the sink use the lowest flow rate of water. If possible, spend less time in the shower. To use less water in the laundry, consider using the bath towels for a few days instead of using clean one daily. For energy savings, if possible do not use a ventilation fan, instead, open the window whilst having ...


1

Stick a water meter on your shower and bath taps. This one looks adequate I don't know what the optimal time to spend in the shower is, or whether a long hot deep bath is more satisfying than a long hot shower, its personal taste. But with a meter you can track how much water each uses and then weigh that against how much satisfaction or washing you get ...


1

Each location on the globe has a wide variety of factors that will influence your answer (temperature, humidity, hours of sunlight, etc.) but there are several age-old solutions that come to mind. Please allow me to share my insights. In most places where you capture a huge volume of runoff there is a very common problem: You get sediment. In my personal ...


1

One of the issues I think would be cost of installing water and electricity meters for each room, including the associated labor cost. It would add to the capital cost of the building. The other issue is with reading the meters. Do you trust a human to correctly read the meters on a daily basis, at check-out times? This adds to the operating costs of the ...


1

Don't bathe (not a joke) Mother Dirt (www.motherdirt.com) is a company selling an atomizer dispersing bacteria that metabolizes perspiration. (Amonia oxidizing bacteria). Replaces the natural skin microbiome. No need (or greatly reduced need) to bathe or shower especially not use soap, which kills the bacteria. Written up in the NY Times, etc. It ...


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