5

It's possible that the source was talking about a practice called jetting that municipalities use to clean their sanitary sewer systems. I know one town that cleaned their system this way every other year.


4

It sounds to me like you want the same product - coffee - without feeling bad about the water it requires. So this might not be the answer you're looking for, but theoretically, the best thing would be to switch to water entirely. Caffeine is addictive, so at first your body will resist, but after a while that will go away. It's also supposed to be healthier ...


3

You could choose to buy coffee from somewhere that's not short of water. I've got a rather nice Costa Rican fairtrade on the go, for example. This doesn't deal with the transport or roasting energy consumption/emissions, but does address your main point.


1

FWIW: I've worked in a kitchen. A Hobart dishwasher uses the same wash water over and over. The rinse cycle runs for 40 seconds at about 5 gpm This replaces some of the wash water. A batch of dishes is whatever fits face down on a 2 foot square tray, or whatever fits in a peg tray, with pegs about every 2.5 inches. So: If you were using 1/2 pint jars ...


1

Rice coffee is popular in the Philippines, where it's available in grocery stores. It's also very simple to make - just roast some white rice in a frying pan, grind it and use it like ground coffee. It doesn't have any caffeine, which is either an advantage or a disadvantage, depending on your preferences. Dandelion coffee is another option. It's made from ...


1

Even though I tend to agree with Wout's answer, I would like to add an alternative solution, specially for those who are not ready to switch to water. I'm currently facing the same problem. Here at the office we drink several cups of coffee per day, and we only have a capsule coffee machine (which entails the problem of plastic waste). Which is why I'm now ...


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