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13

There are various ways to include thermal mass with a lower weight. Different substances have different specific specific heat. So, for a given weight, a material with twice the specific heat, will have twice the thermal mass. Water has one of the highest specific heat values of any known material, so for a heat buffer with high thermal mass, low weight, ...


13

(Corrected)The "thermal mass" value you're interested in increasing is essentially the same (exceptions mentioned in this other answer) as the mass (essentially weight, for those not into learning physics!) of your material multiplied by its "specific heat capacity". That doesn't help much when it comes to keeping mass down. However, there is a way around ...


10

Yes you can store it outside. That said, your practice is less than optimal. KD wood is normally dried to something like 12% moisture content. Air dried wood will eventually reach a level between 15 and 20% depending on how humid your climate is. The 12% figure corresponds to the equilibrium moisture level of wood used in a house assuming the house is ...


7

I am by no means an expert in rocket stoves, but just in case we don't have a rocket stove expert here, I'll offer what I know. While rocket mass heaters have become popular in the USA as an efficient way for hippies in cob houses to stay warm with very little fuel, they originated as a way to cook when wood fuel was scarce. The basic principle is this: ...


6

https://chimneysweeponline.com/howood.htm lists the energy content of a wide range of wood types. Some examples that are perhaps relevant to you: Beech, Blue (Carpinus caroliniana): 23.7 MBTU/cord Ash, Black (Fraxinus nigra): 17.9 MBTU/cord Sycamore, American (Platanus occidentalis): 17.9 MBTU/cord Larch (Larix laricina): 19.5 MBTU/cord Cottonwood (Populus ...


5

A place to start would be the heat output rating. The Vermont Bun Baker is rated at 30,000 Btu/hr. The Garrison wood stove (1976 model 2) is rated at 37,000 Btu/hr. But these are hard to compare since the newer oven is likely the EPA rating and the older one is likely a maximum output rating. Then you need to consider how fast your home loses heat, outside ...


4

A simple incremental addition is to add a top cover to your stove. Presuming you don't cook on the stove this is a nice addition that most woodstoves would be better to have. You will need an assessment of the load bearing capacity of the floor. That information should be available in the building specifications for your home. If you don't have them (...


4

I don't have enough reputation yet to write a comment, so don't see this as an answer, more like a recommendation. I grew up with a wood stove, so maybe I can help. This may be one of the causes of my temperatures (around 100-200 C) which do not take off easily. That is definitely not a good temperature to burn wood. You want the fire to be >300°C for ...


3

Yes. Moz's comment is correct. When burning wood, you are in essence just shortcutting the rot process. Which means that instead of fungi and bacteria and bugs getting lunch, you get warm. These critters have their place, so it's not a good idea to intercept all of the production of a given forest. For this reason a high efficiency stove can be more ...


3

Some years ago I rented a house that had a wood burning fire place in the rear of the home. It was a fairly smart layout as the fireplace was in the family room and there was a 3 step up area to the kitchen, then small raise in each ceiling as you went through the home, then the stairway going up to the bedrooms in the front of the home. This allowed heat to ...


2

I've designed my own stoves and outdoor boilers and met with considerable success with my boiler projects in particular. My first outdoor boiler was a free "jack" boiler, very small, but with some mods, heated my thousand sq. Home and domestic hot water on less than half the wood my friends with $5k-$10k boilers used. The rocket stove mass heaters are ...


1

Native timber species (that just might be offered to you) as fuel (all 5% moisture): Beech 17Mj/kg Oak 16MJ/kg Pine 17MJ/kg (BTU/cord would be little understood in these islands) Remember that pine is substantially less dense than the hardwoods A source for the info: UN FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORG WOOD FUELS HANDBOOK Most important: CLEAN YOUR CHIMNEY! As ...


1

To store the energy from a fireplace you need mass. Solids like concrete can store 0.88 kJ/kgK, Water can store 4.18 kJ/kgK. So water can store 4.75 times more energy than concrete. Therefore a modern waterbased heating system combined with a waterbased stove can store much more energy and deliver it to any places further away in your house /apartment. ...


1

No, in all likelyhood not. What you achieve with adding thermal mass: Wood stoves are cleanest and most efficient when they burn 'at full throttle.' Thermal mass allows you to have short intervals of high heat in the oven, that you store and give to the room in a smooth way. For this to really work, you need a lot of mass - see Sherwoods anser. But you only ...


1

Yes, but not that way. You need far more mass than that. You need 2-5 tons of brick around the stove. This will require extra support underneath. 6x6 beams under the affected part of the stove with teleposts should be sufficient. Google "Russian Stove"; "Masonry stove" or kachelofen. http://heatkit.com/docs/course.PDF describes using a steel insert ...


1

For casual use, have the feed come in at a slope to the burn chamber allows the stove to self feed as the ends burn off. The burn chamber has to be large enough for the heat to start pyrolizing the wood chunks. If the chimney is the same diameter as the feed tube it's harder to get a balance of air speeds that will keep the fire from moving up the feed ...


1

I consider the Rocket Stove design as described below. Design | | | | | | feed | | heat riser | | | ^ | | * ====== | | |* * --------| | ================ * fire, - air flow The feed is in an upright position(1). The air flow is being created by the extra combustion of the solid particles ...


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