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To produce fresh water from sea water sustainably (i.e. sustainable in usage, if not in production), I think solar stills are your best bet. The article "Solar Thermal Technologies for Seawater Desalination: state of the art" by Jenny Lindblom (PDF) states that a single-layer solar still can produce up to 6 litres per day, per square metre. More intricate (...


9

Summary The 4 metals currently extracted (in combination with other materials (eg "salt") or as ions in an extraction process are the only ones commercially viable at present, and may be the only ones readily able to be extracted for the forseeable future. The "big 4" are - Sodium Magnesium Calcium Potassium, Energy considerations make the ...


8

In effect, nature does this already. The sun heats up a patch of ocean, water evaporates and rises into the atmosphere. The vapour then condenses on airborne aerosols to form clouds which are then moved by winds and given the correct atmospheric conditions, rain falls. To produce significant amounts of water from a solar still would require either an ...


6

You think big, I'll grant you that. This is a partial answer, probably should be a comment, but it's too damn big. Factor 1: The ocean is large. 1.3 billion cubic kilometers. Most of the disolved minerals are present in very small numbers. You are going to have to process cubic km of water. I suspect that the only way to do this economically is to ...


5

I think this is one of the "gaping holes" you are looking for: The amount of Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) in sea water is about 40,000ppm. Thus for every 1,000L of sea water distilled, you would have 40L of solids left behind after distillation. The amount of room left for water (i.e. the capacity of the 'hole') would thus decrease by 4% each time it was ...


5

A solar still CAN convert sea water to potable water. They are commonly included in lifeboat kits. Check the Watercone or this survival guide.


4

Here are a couple of papers published between 2011 and 2016: Ranjan, K. R., and S. C. Kaushik. 2013. ‘Energy, Exergy and Thermo-Economic Analysis of Solar Distillation Systems: A Review’. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 27 (November): 709–23. doi:10.1016/j.rser.2013.07.025. Velmurugan, V., and K. Srithar. 2011. ‘Performance Analysis of Solar Stills ...


4

Seawater is no more a sustainable source of minerals than mining is. They're both depleting a finite resource, insofar as the minerals in the sea come from rock erosion anyway. There's a small difference in that some of the minerals in the sea come from waste from human activities. But in those cases, mining landfill sites or doing mineral extraction at ...


4

I have been pursuing this problem for many years and I have come up with a viable solution that I have developed from my 10 years of research and commercial application. I have developed a system called SSTCS-"Synergistic Sustainable Tumble Culture System" that can take eutophic water from point source pollution from effluent or no point pollution that ...


2

What do we use water for in every-day life? And can we use untreated seawater instead? Because: untreated seawater is what the PO's is supposed to use instead of fresh water. :) Bathing. Maybe Either in the sea or in the bathtub. Yes, if you want to cool down and don't mind the salt. No, not if you want to get really clean. Or should we update our ...


2

I haven't seen a comprehensive list. In fact all the sea mineral products I've seen on the net are for home gardening. ag-usa has a list of four home gardening mineral products they say make up the market. seamazing offers a similar product. Sounds like this list will grow, along with the sea mineral products offered. I wouldn't rush to the conclusion, ...


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