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13

I'm not going to answer the support the recycling part of your question, but the avoid new production part. One stream of aluminium goes in to the coating of plastic for packaging food (coffee, crisps, etc). Although this layer is extremely thin (0.0055-0.1 mm) the total amounts are large. Recycling this metalized plastic (metalized film) is doable but ...


10

Quick summary: The city and the country both have positives and negatives in pollution production... the data here suggests perhaps the urban core produces slightly less pollution (depending upon how you score follow-on effects)... But both areas fall far far short of the exurbs, where people combine the negatives of both the city and the country for ...


8

The simplest rule to follow is this: Buy Less Stuff Some people replace large articles of furniture (couch, fridge, bed) every 3-5 years, often for reasons of style or fashion. That stuff has to be made and shipped to where you buy it. If you keep those things for 30 years (which is by no means impossible or even particularly different) you have a big ...


8

I already provided an answer to this question here, which was written based on personal experience and knowledge, but in this second answer I wanted to address some interesting details and specific measures I found online. Paper 1 A recent survey paper from the University of Lund says that the best lifestyle choices to reduce your footprint are: 1. ...


8

(If I have understood your question properly) The major role of Social Networking sites in the sustainable living is: Spreading awareness about the environmental problems that we are facing today. Educating others and clearing the doubts of others as well as ours related to the field of environment and sustainable living. (That's what sustainability.SE ...


7

I'm going to focus on energy and carbon emissions because that's what I know best. Anyone wanting to add waste generation and other considerations please feel free. Chad is right that the question depends first on how your kids live and where you decide to live. Geography and economy are very important variables. A study by Chris Jones at UC Berkeley ...


5

Any check is better than no check. But people are very good at selling themselves. They can say one thing and have intentions you do not suspect. For instance, they may agree to rules about dogs, loud music, working bees, but in the back of their mind know that once they're in, they will do whatever they like—build a meth lab, perhaps. This happened to a ...


5

Three routes: A: Your van has all your worldly possessions. B: In addition you have a place you can store stuff. C: Use a car towable R.V. A: Everything is in your van. Consider removing the back doors and buiding a box that fits into this space. The back panel folds down to make a table. A propane tank and a gas stove is how you cook. Or you have ...


4

Carbon offsets aren't a perfect solution by any means, but provided the activity being funded by the offset is genuine and sensible for the long term, carbon offsets could certainly be considered to be a good solution. For example, if you help fund technology that reduces fossil fuel use that wouldn't otherwise have been able to be funded, then you could ...


4

Here is a good resource for compounds which can be harmful, although they are more related to health rather than environmental concern. That said, anything which is toxic to humans is likely toxic to other organisms, especially when concentrated and bioamplified. I'll summarize the environmental effects below: The really common ones you hear bad things ...


4

I'd suggest getting a high-quality enamel baking dish - enamel/ceramic, in my experience, is much better at being "non-stick" than Teflon, lasts a lot longer, as well as avoiding the potential risks of the latter. That way you won't need to line it, thus avoiding the foil.


3

You (probably) cannot do it on demand side. The reason this is impossible is that 99% of aluminum users don't care if their aluminum comes from recycled sources. Let's say there's need for 100 units of aluminum, out of which 50 units are new, and 50 units are recycled. Now, you introduce one unit of aluminum consumption, with the requirement that it comes ...


3

The best measure for comparing lifestyles from an ecological point of view is probably the ecological footprint. An ecological footprint is a measure for the amount of productive land and sea area that is needed to support a particular activity, lifestyle, person, or group of people. Or more simple; it's how much land you need to produce something or support ...


3

The most important role for social media I see is to provide the alternative solutions to those that we are bombarded in mass media and advertisements. The promoted model of life is buy-as-much-as-you-can, throw-as-fast-as-you-are-bored. We can provide the tips, how to: 1) Save money by buying more consciously, and therefore less 2) Repair things, ...


2

"1.3 tonnes of CO2" is a figure that someone came up with by averaging the fuel per passenger trip and then converting it to emissions. It's not a number you actually need to worry about. Think about it this way: A flight from A -> B will depart at the scheduled time regardless of how many passengers are on board. Virtually the same amount of fuel will ...


2

The largest predictor of sustainable consumption is poverty. The diverse rich all consume far more resources. Because there is a robust relationship between income and health, and even between income and happiness, I would expect that across large populations the happiest are behaving less sustainably. The environmental behavior of rich countries affects ...


2

I recently returned to NZ after visiting family in the UK for Christmas. This is a round trip of some 40,000km. My solution is to pay for some 60 trees to be planted, here in NZ. This is not a perfect solution, I know, but it salves my conscience somewhat and is definitely better than doing nothing. IMO, Tim’s answer above is accounting sophistry that is ...


2

Fossil fuels are a finite, non-renewable resource. Finite, non-renewable resources eventually run out. That is inevitable. What happens in practice, though, is that as a non-renewable resource runs out, it becomes harder and harder (more and more expensive) to exploit. That drives up the cost of the resource for consumers. As the cost rises, consumers ...


2

I'm afraid it will be very hard to find evidence for this, but I can think of two arguments in favor of a Yes answer: If people know that others 'do the right thing', they will be more likely to do that themselves. This is one of the reasons for taking action that e.g. Per Espen Stokness writes about in his book What We Think About When We Try Not To Think ...


2

We have to first be honest with ourselves in that we do not really know how the future will unfold. What we do know is that there are currently 1.5 billion people on the planet enjoying a high-energy consumption lifestyle and the rest are aspiring to become a part of the 1.5 billion. As the cheap, easy to extract energy sources become depleted, temporary ...


2

You can advocate for a carbon tax. When fossil fuel energy costs more, recycling is more economically valuable. Cheap power means easier to mine new aluminum. We really need a carbon tax for many reasons. They used to make a zillion tons of aluminum in the United States Pacific Northwest with dirt-cheap hydro power. But when electricity got expensive in ...


1

As others have said, there isn't a single place to look. For the cars, however, "NextGreenCar" has a comparison tool you can use. Using your figures of 100 miles a week (so 62,400 miles over your 12 year old car's lifespan), and my own 14 year old Diesel car and a new Kia e-Niro replaced every 2 years for comparison: Diesel: Car 2.65T, Fuel 3.7T, Tailpipe ...


1

About pollution: there are two kinds of pollutants: local (carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter) and global (carbon dioxide, ozone-depleting substances). Ozone depletion is a problem that has been successfully solved, thanks to the Montreal protocol. Thus, ozone layer will be even better in 2050 than it is today. The maximum ...


1

Emissions per passenger kilometre will be high in your van, unless you carry more people! Consider picking up hitchhikers or doing ride sharing :)


1

Much depends on the local hierarchy of settlement. Canada tends to have smaller numbers of larger cities. There are relatively few cities in the 50-100K class. At present I live on a farm. (I grow landscape trees) * It's 6 miles to the nearest village. This is where I pickup parcels, and sometimes milk. It's also where I can take my lawnmower to be ...


1

My contribution to pollution comes from three main areas: my travel, both the daily commute as well as shopping, visiting, and recreation how I heat my house stuff I buy and throw out If you truly want to hold everything else constant, the country-dweller will have far more travel (since everything is further apart.) It is my experience, however, that ...


1

KubaFYI, in light of the update you made to your question, I am submitting a second answer for your consideration. The title of the question is "How can I make my family understand my CO2-emissions-related hesitation to fly in order to spend time with them?" In the update you say that "This question was meant to be ... more about how to negotiate a ...


1

General recommendations In many households in the developed world the largest sources of CO2 emissions are transportation (car fuel), electricity, heating and food. This means that the average household can reduce its carbon footprint most effectively by taking measures such as: installing PV panels to generate electricity buying an electric vehicle (...


1

Becoming a vegan is the fastest way to do this. Check out this film for clear evidence:http://www.cowspiracy.com/facts/


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